Why are some people getting sick with bugs and others getting sicker?

LIONEL GARCIA/REUTERS There are so many reasons that people get sick from a bug.

For some, it’s a mild illness that’s gone unnoticed, like a cold.

But for others, it can be fatal. 

For instance, a new study suggests that people who have Lyme disease have a higher risk of dying than people who don’t have it.

That finding could help inform how the disease is treated, and could ultimately save lives.

The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, looked at more than 7,000 people with Lyme disease in four U.S. cities over a period of more than a decade.

The researchers found that those who had Lyme disease were more likely to be hospitalized for more than six weeks than the non-infected group.

The risk of death was higher in the Lyme-negative group than in the healthy controls.

That could be due to a number of factors, including higher rates of hospitalization among those who develop Lyme disease.

The authors said that the data they gathered suggests that Lyme disease may be linked to higher rates and longer hospitalization rates, which could mean a greater need for medical care. 

In their study, researchers looked at hospitalizations for about 2,000 of the participants with Lyme, and compared the rates of people who had been treated with antibiotics versus those who didn’t.

The results were stark.

The infection rate for people with untreated Lyme disease was about twice as high as it was for the healthy people in the study, the researchers found. 

But the researchers also found that people with a history of Lyme disease tended to have a lower rate of hospitalizations, which the researchers speculated could be related to the type of antibiotic used to treat Lyme disease and the way the disease spreads. 

“There are so few studies on the impact of Lyme-associated infection on mortality,” said lead author Lillian J. DeLuca, a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of Washington.

“We found that when people have a history, that can be a significant predictor of survival.

It’s very hard to tease out why, but we think it’s related to infection risk and to the course of the disease.” 

The study’s findings could have implications for treating patients, who are often treated with a different type of medicine than those with Lyme. 

Researchers say it’s important to remember that the symptoms of Lyme are different from the symptoms people typically experience with the disease.

In addition, some people may not have symptoms at all, and others might have mild or severe symptoms. 

Still, DeLucas stressed that people should be able to choose their own antibiotics. 

People should be informed about their risk for developing Lyme disease, DeMarcus said.

“When people are asked questions like, ‘Is it possible to get Lyme disease?’ and, ‘Do you know if it’s Lyme or not?’ that’s a question that’s more relevant than it ever has been,” DeLucia said. 

DeMarcus also emphasized that the study was limited by the small sample size, and that the results should not be taken as evidence that people shouldn’t take any steps to prevent Lyme disease infections. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has urged people to get vaccinated if they have symptoms of any of the three infections.